Springfield vape shop weighs in on possible electronic cigarette flavor ban

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (KY3) - Following the deaths of 6-people across the country and 450 possible cases of vaping-related lung illnesses, the Trump administration is considering a full ban on all flavored electronic cigarettes.

At this point in the investigation no single device, ingredient or additive has been identified as the problem. 

"People are dying with vaping. So we are looking at it very closely," said President Donald Trump in a news conference Wednesday.

Vaping related illnesses are becoming more common in the United States.

And President Trump announced a possible ban on e-cigarette flavors that he believes could change that.

"We can't allow people to get sick and we can't have our youth be so affected," Trump said.

The ban would include every flavor, but one: tobacco.

Jake Cannon is a clerk at Vapor 100. He said the flavored e-cigarette juice accounts for about 95% of their profits and cutting down the options could force them to take a pretty big hit.

"At least, very least, 600 bottles that we would either have to destroy, get rid of, send somewhere and would just be a huge loss of money," said Cannon.

Cannon said his main concern is the safety of his customers, because if he doesn't have choices customers might come up with their own.

"The government banned alcohol but people still made it because people get what people want," said Cannon. "That raises the question of are they going to make it with the right ingredients at home? Are they going to make it with the right flavorings, is someone going to get hurt?"

Many customers go into Vapor 100 to wean themselves off of cigarettes.

"People come in and put a pack of cigarettes on the counter and say 'help me, I want to be done," said Cannon.

Cannon said he can't deny that the flavors help do help create an incentive for quitting cigarettes.

"It's trying to get people away from smoking and eventually down to no nicotine is our end goal," he said. "If we can't offer a service that people like more than cigarettes, they're just going to stay with cigarettes."

Cannon believes the potential ban will not help the problem.

"In the end people are going to do what people want to do and get what they want," he said. "But is it going to hurt more people than it already may or may not be hurting right now?"

Read the original version of this article at www.ky3.com.